Andalusian (Pure Spanish) Horse Names

The Andalusian horse dates back to the 15th century, where it originates from the rugged hills of the Iberian Peninsula. The Spanish horse has a few distinct features like its sturdy build, thick mane and tail, elegant gait, popularly seen with a gray hue, it’s courageous and agile, plus has been a cavalry and warhorse.

From these features, some of the greatest horse names include Valiente or Hernan for brave, Eugenio or Alonzo for Noble, or Gris, Silver, or Dusty that translates to gray. 

Follow us into the discussion as we look into great names for Andalusian horses, reminisce about the famous Andalusians, and interesting facts about them.

Famous Andalusian Horses

Babieca 

Babieca was a famous warhorse of the Spanish legend warrior El Cid in the 15th century. Babieca was born of a noble Iberian bred (Andalusian) and raised in the Carthusian monastery. The colt was a weakling, and the monks viewed the horse as spindly and a liability. 

However, one of the monks: Pedro El Grande, choose the colt for his nephew Rodrigo Diaz De Vivar to ride and named it Babieca, meaning fool or stupid. As Rodrigo became a fierce and well-respected soldier, his horse Babieca grew into a dedicated and well-trained warhorse, becoming Spain’s most honored horse. By then, Rodrigo went by the name El Cid Campeador (Lord, Champion of Warriors)

After Rodrigo Diaz died, the horse was never ridden by anyone and died two years later. Babieca will be remembered as a formidable warhorse who carried his master fearlessly into war for many years. Even in death, the legacy of El Cid and Babieca remains in history. 

Opus 

Opus is an Andalusian stallion who was incredible at bullfighting. He was ridden by Alvarito Domecq whose father bred many Spanish horses and bulls. Opus and Alvarito won for their last ride, after which the horse was unsaddled, unbridled, and allowed to take a victory lap around the stadium’s packed capacity to celebrate the horse’s retirement.

Novilheiro

Novilheiro is the brother of Opus, who was born in 1971, while Opus was born in 1972. A breeder bought Novilheiro in Portugal, where he stayed for most of his stud life, after which he went to France to be a dressage horse. While in France, he was discovered by a British rider called John Whitaker, who anticipated his potential for jumping. 

While under Whitaker, Novilheiro became the British Jumping Champion and later the Jumping-Horse Leader in the Rank of Prize Money in Europe. Novilheiro, the brilliant gray stallion, was a force to reckon with in the Grand Prix dressage show and continues in their bloodlines.

Nonetheless, both brothers created famous bloodlines in Portugal and Spain for dressage and bullfighting. 

Evento

Evento was a PRE horse legendary at dressage but passed away at the age of 29. He was ridden by Ignacio Rambla, who raised the horse to fame at the International 1996 Olympic games in Atlanta. His performance at the dressage while representing Spain made Evento one of the most crucial PRE horses, after which he was nicknamed: the Icebreaker PRE.

Evento is still one of Spain’s National treasures which his sire Distuiguido continues to shine after his bronze win at the 2003 and 2005 European championships.

Pure Spanish Horses
A group white Andalusians

Female Andalusian Horse Names

Aadab – to be hopeful

Adoncia – Mexican to meaning the sweet one 

Aidan – Irish for little fiery 

Akira 

Alba – Spanish for white, pure, or bright

Alejandra 

Alexia – meaning protector or defender 

Almira – meaning nobility 

Amaranta 

Amparo 

Anahi – Spanish for beautiful

Anastasia 

Apolo/ Apollo/ Apolonia – from the god Apollo meaning strength 

Aurora 

Ayame

Belita/ Bella – meaning beautiful 

Bolt

Bonita

Brina – Spanish to mean a shiny thing 

Brixia/Bricia 

Catalina/Catarina/ Cate

Crisantemo

Dahlias/Dahlia

Dash

Diana 

Dom 

Eiko 

Emilia

Estrella/Estella – meaning a star

Fury

Gen/Genevieve/Genoveva

Girasol – Spanish for a sunflower

Gloria

Grizelda

Jacinta

Jazmin

Kahlo

Lavanda/Lavender 

Linda/Lindo – Spanish to mine nice or sweet-tempered

Lirio – Spanish for the Spanish lily

Lola – meaning a strong one

Luna

Maravilla

Marcella 

Margarita

Maricruz 

Marta/Marita 

Mudra

Ollie

Paloma

Reina

Rosa/Rosalind/Rosalva 

Tierra/Tiarra/Tia

Valentina

Verano – Spanish to mean shiny or summer

Victoria 

Male Horse Names 

Adolfo – means a strong wolf 

Alexandro 

Alonso – to be ready for a battle 

Alonzo – nobility 

Ambrosio 

Amerigo

Amias

Andres 

Angelino

Anibal 

Armando 

Axel – from a Scandinavian origin, the name means excellent.

Challen 

Dario

El Fuego 

Emilio

Enrico 

Esteban – to be victorious 

Eugenio – means nobility 

Federigo 

Felipe 

Feliz – Spanish to mean happy 

Fernando 

Fresco

Gerardo – to be respected or courageous 

Gregorio 

Guillermo – an independent thinker

Herminio

Hernan

Ignacio 

Jandro – from Alexandro, meaning protector of mankind 

Jarron 

Jeronimo – to mean a savior

Jove

Leandro/Leonardo – to mean lion

Lorenzo 

Marco – one who fights or is constantly at war. 

Matias 

Maximo 

Miguel 

Oswaldo

Pablo 

Pazel 

Poderoso 

Raro – Spanish to mean rare

Ras

Raul 

Rejinaldo

Rodolfo

Rodrigo – to mean a war chief

Rubio – from the Spanish origin, it means light-colored or a blonde male

Santos

Solamente 

Supremos 

Valerio 

Vicente

Fun & Interesting Facts About the Andalusian Horse

  1. The Andalusian horses are popularly referred to as PRE: Pura Raza española, which translates to Pure Spanish Horse. The Lusitano of Portugal, which is also similar to the Andalusian horses, is also a PRE.
  2. They’re a very distinct breed dating back to the 15th century.
  3. They were prizes for nobility by the Spanish government, who also used the horse as a tool for diplomacy with the government and kings across Europe.
  4. Most Andalusians are gray or bay, with over 80% of American Andalusians being gray, but there are others in varied colors, including chestnut, palomino, buckskin, cremello, pearl, black, and dun.
  5. Andalusian horses have long been war horses serving Greeks and Romans, including King Felipe II, who was suspected of giving the breed standards back in the 16th century and changing the work of the horse from war to dressage.
  6. They’re versatile, working as war horses, classical dressage, stock horses, bullfighting, driving, equestrian activities, and show jumping.
  7. The Andalusian has the perfect gait for dressage, an extended, Elevated, metrical, and harmonious movement with a rounded balance and forward steps. They also have highly flexible joints on the knees and fetlocks, which allows them to perform complex techniques during dressage like kicks and leaps.
  8. The horse features unique characteristics like a complete and flowing mane and tail long enough to touch the ground.
  9. There are superstitions associated with the Andalusian horse. For example, if the horse has whorls or white markings, it’s an indication of either good or bad luck, whereas if the horse has two whorls near the ends of the tail, it’s a sign of good luck or courage. Another superstition is that horses with white socks on their feet were considered good or bad luck, depending on the leg or legs marked. If the horse has no white marks, then it’s ill-tempered. 
  10. The Andalusian horse has influenced many horse breeds, including the Lusitano of Portugal, American Quarter Horse, Azteca, and Wallander horse. 
  11. The Spanish horse features in many movies, including Cinderella, Lord of Rings, Lara Croft: The Tomb Raider, Gladiator, Interview with a Vampire, Chronicles of Narnia, King Arthur, and Braveheart.

Sources 

  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andalusian_horse
  • https://ihearthorses.com/andalusian-horse-facts-you-might-not-have-known/
  • https://www.animalfactsencyclopedia.com/Andalusian-horse.html
  • https://andalusianworld.com/site/the-legend-of-el-cid-and-babieca-andalusians-in-history-and-mythology/

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